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Honda iPhone App Enables Viewers to Interact With TV Spot

 The Jazz just might be all that.

In its "This Unpredictable Life" campaign, whose very structure reflects a musical riff, Honda brings us a psychedelic, animated TV spot voiced over by, of all people, Garrison Keillor. There's even an iPhone app that enables viewers to swipe characters right off the TV using "screen hopping" technology and then interact with the characters by doing things like singing into the phone's microphone to get the monkey character to dance.

 According to Creativity, this screen hopping technology uses audio recognition to sync the app to the spots soundtrack, identifying which character to "catch."

I'm not yet sure if I would download an app in the hopes of seeing a TV commercial, and then whipping out the phone in time to catch a character. But it is an innovative idea, and it does point to new possibilities in activating traditional through the power of mobile. I didn't learn much about the Jazz, but at least I might be open to doing so.

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>>> AVAILABLE EVERYWHERE BOOKS ARE SOLD <<<

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Interview: Confessions of a 'Crash The Super Bowl' Winner (Pt 2)

Joe and dave 2 Call it the myth of the consumer-created Super Bowl spot.

In part two of this source interview with Joe and Dave Herbert for the new book, THE ON-DEMAND BRAND, the guys behind "Free Doritos," the first Doritos "Crash The Super Bowl" contest winner to top USA Today's Ad Meter, talk about the nature of "consumer-created" ad contests. In short: They're not really for everyday Schmos, though, in the case of Pepsi Max/Doritos contest, at least they're open to all comers.

In reality, pros may have the upper hand.

Past winners like "Live the Flavor" (guy crashes car while eying attractive  girl), "Checkout Girl" (cashier and customer raucously bond over Doritos  flavors) and "Free Doritos" (co-workers throw a crystal ball into vending  machine in order to score some free Doritos, then run into trouble when  one of them accidentally throws the ball into their boss's nether regions) all come from professionals - not everyday consumers.

"Live the Flavor" came from Dale Backus and Wes Philips, professional  videographers with their own commercial production company. "Checkout  Girl" came from Kristin Dehnert, who is an award-winning filmmaker.

And the Herbert Brothers have their own production company, called Transit Films.

That's not to say these aren't grass roots efforts. In part one of our conversation, we learned that the Herberts only spent a couple hundred dollars, and produced the spot with a cast and crew of friends. In this case, the brothers Herbert were simply trying to break into the big time - which they did to hilarious effect.

My beef is not with the brands or contestants - the Pepsi Max/Doritos contest makes no pretension of everyday people winning. Rather, the contest is open to everyone and, if the spot's good enough, it might just win enough votes to go to the Super Bowl. Obviously, the best entries will be well produced. In other words, it's completely fair.

Rather, most media outlets frame such contests in general, and this contest in particular, as an example of how everyday people are beating ad industry professionals at their own game.

Which couldn't be further from the truth - though you'd never know it from most media accounts. It's often up-and-coming pros (and in some instances, established pros) just doing their thing.

As I recently told National Public Radio, "It's ironic, because the people who actually end up winning these things are the people who could probably build careers in advertising, if they aren't already." 

In part two, we'll hear the Herberts' perspective on this - and what it means to the future of advertising.

INTERVIEW: 'CRASH THE SUPER BOWL' WINNERS JOE & DAVE HERBERT (PT 2)

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AVAILABLE EVERYWHERE BOOKS ARE SOLD

OD_cover "... Excellent  ..."

 “Through persuasive arguments and q&a’s with the major players in advertising, Mathieson makes an excellent case for greater creativity and outside-the-box thinking backed up with solid ideas.” – Publishers Weekly


 

 

 

 

 

 

>>> IN STORES APRIL 21 - READ MORE HERE <<<

 

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Interview: Confessions of A 'Crash The Super Bowl' Winner (Pt 1)

 When is "consumer created" advertising really a showcase for professionals?

Look no further than the Doritos/Pepsi Max "Crash The Super Bowl" contest. When the big game hits February 6, so will numerous news stories about how a handful of everyday consumers showed up Madison Avenue professionals by submitting their own TV commercials for the chance to be shown during the Super Bowl.

There's just one hitch: Few if any of them were created by everyday consumers.

In fact, the winners of this and other so-called consumer-created video contests tend to be semi- or fully-professional filmmakers who could have just as easily been the ones hired by ad agencies to create the spots in the first place.

In the case of "Crash The Super Bowl," (which is run by agency Goodby, Silverstein & Partners), past winners like "Live the Flavor" (guy crashes car while eying attractive girl), "Checkout Girl" (cashier and customer raucously bond over Doritos flavors) and "Free Doritos" (co-workers throw a crystal ball into vending machine in order to score some free Doritos, then run into trouble when one of them accidentally throws the ball into their boss's nether regions) all come from near- or full-time professionals - not everyday consumers.

"Live the Flavor" came from Dale Backus and Wes Philips, professional videographers with their own commercial production company. "Checkout Girl" came from Kristin Dehnert, who is an award-winning filmmaker. And Joe and Dave Herbert, the guys behind "Free Doritos," the first "Crash" entrant to win $1 million for topping the annual USA Today Ad Meter, are professional videographers with their own independent film studio, called Transit Films, which offers advertising and animation services, among other things. As a result, their entries look great. They're well shot, well cast and well produced. Doritos' own ad agency couldn't have done better.

As I recently told National Public Radio, "It's ironic, because the people who actually end up winning these things are the people who could probably build careers in advertising, if they aren't already." 

That's not to say the winners have done anything wrong, or that the spots aren't grassroots efforts - last year's "Underdog," from Joshua Svoboda, who just happened to be, yes, a creative director at a production company called 5 Point Productions, reportedly cost only $200 to shoot. It's just that the money spent is spent by someone who is arguably a pro, not just some Schmo shooting a spot in the backyard.

And I don't really blame the brands for failing to clear up the confusion - they open up these contests to all comers, voting is open to all comers as well, and it stands to reason that the really good entries will win.

But as I talk about in my new book, THE ON-DEMAND BRAND, maybe it's time the news media stop framing these promotions as if the mean a ticket to the big time for anyone with a Handicam and Hollywood dreams.

In audio segments from a source interview for the book recorded right after their big win, I interview Joe and Dave Herbert - the guys behind "Free Doritos" - about what it took to make their winning spot (they're great guys, and it's a fun story about aspiring, and making it, to the Super Bowl).

In part two, which I'll post tomorrow, we'll hear their own perspectives on the truth about just how consumer-created, "consumer-created" really is.

INTERVIEW: 'CRASH THE SUPER BOWL' WINNERS JOE & DAVE HERBERT (PT 1)

 

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AVAILABLE EVERYWHERE BOOKS ARE SOLD

OD_cover "... Excellent  ..."

 “Through persuasive arguments and q&a’s with the major players in advertising, Mathieson makes an excellent case for greater creativity and outside-the-box thinking backed up with solid ideas.” – Publishers Weekly


 

 

 

 

 

 

>>> IN STORES APRIL 21 - READ MORE HERE <<<

 

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Hyperfactory SVP Jeff Arbour (Concl): Getting Real About Augmented Reality

 For 2011, it's out with the gimmicks and in with the good stuff when it comes to mobile augmented reality.

At least that's the word from Jeff Arbour, SVP of The Hyperfactory, in a follow up conversation to a source interview we did for the new book, THE ON-DEMAND BRAND.

In this conclusion of our conversation, we talk about how QR codes and other forms of 2D barcodes msut overcome some considerable challenges, and about how mobile augmented reality will take off as marketers get past the silly stuff and start getting more purposeful. Along the way, we'll hear about some of his favorite existing AR apps - including IKEA's (shown here) - and what it will take for AR to really take off;

INTERVIEW: JEFF ARBOUR, SVP, THE HYPERFACTORY (Concl) - GETTING REAL WITH MOBILE AR

(Approx. 4:13)

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>>> IN STORES NOW - LEARN MORE (AND ORDER YOUR COPY) - HERE <<<

OD_cover

"... EXCELLENT ..."

Publisher's Weekly

 

"... A MUST-READ ..."

Russell Weiner, Chief Marketing Officer, Domino's Pizza, Inc.

 

"... WITTY, INSIGHTFUL, DYNAMIC AND HIGHLY INSPIRING ..."

Alison Moore, Vice President, Brand Strategy & Digital Platforms, HBO

 

"... TRULY A MUST-READ FOR MARKETERS WHO NEED TO CUT THROUGH THE CLUTTER ..."

Connor Brady, Chief Creative Officer, Organic, Inc.

 

"... REQUIRED READING FOR THE DIGITAL AGE ..."

Peter Cole, Technology Director, RGA

 

 >>> IN STORES NOW - LEARN MORE (AND ORDER YOUR COPY) - HERE <<<


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Hyperfactory SVP Jeff Arbour (Pt 2): Supercharging Traditional Through The Power of Mobile

The future of traditional advertising may lay in mobile.

In the new book, THE ON-DEMAND BRAND, and also in my first book, BRANDING UNBOUND, I argue that the real power of mobile lies in supercharging the effectiveness of traditional advertising.

 

Simply put, mobile makes everything interactive. Our television ads become interactive. Our radio ads become interactive. Our print ads become interactive. Our direct mail becomes interactive. Our outdoor signage becomes interactive. Our storefronts become interactive. Our point of purchase becomes interactive. Even our products themselves become an opportunity to have an interactions with consumers that is really quite unprecedented.

 The other day, I was talking to Hyperfactory SVP Jeff Arbour about some of the conversation he and I have in THE ON-DEMAND BRAND about this dynamic, and we continue it here. In part two: How mobile can supercharge traditional advertising - a proposition that has been much more prevalent in other markets around the world, and is only now catching on the US in a very big way. 

Along the way, we discuss some of the promise - and peril - of location-based services and how to keep them relevant for the long term.

INTERVIEW: JEFF ARBOUR, SVP, THE HYPERFACTORY (PT 2) - THE TRADITIONAL/MOBILE CONNECTION

(Approx. 5:57)

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>>> IN STORES NOW - LEARN MORE (AND ORDER YOUR COPY) - HERE <<<

OD_cover

"... EXCELLENT ..."

Publisher's Weekly

 

"... A MUST-READ ..."

Russell Weiner, Chief Marketing Officer, Domino's Pizza, Inc.

 

"... WITTY, INSIGHTFUL, DYNAMIC AND HIGHLY INSPIRING ..."

Alison Moore, Vice President, Brand Strategy & Digital Platforms, HBO

 

"... TRULY A MUST-READ FOR MARKETERS WHO NEED TO CUT THROUGH THE CLUTTER ..."

Connor Brady, Chief Creative Officer, Organic, Inc.

 

"... REQUIRED READING FOR THE DIGITAL AGE ..."

Peter Cole, Technology Director, RGA

 

 >>> IN STORES NOW - LEARN MORE (AND ORDER YOUR COPY) - HERE <<<


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Interview: Hyperfactory SVP Jeff Arbour (Pt 1): iPad Apps That Rock for Kraft, Gerber +

 As the saying goes, there's always an app for that - whatever "that" is.

But what makes an app successful?

I was recently in New York City to moderate a panel on trends in mobile marketing that featured, among other luminaries, Derek Handley, the kinetic co-founder of The Hyperfactory.

For those out of the know, The Hyperfactory has been the force behind a number of the world's most innovative mobile initiatives, several of which are featured in the new book, THE ON-DEMAND BRAND (available everywhere books are sold). Among its recent hits: The "Big Fork, Little Fork" iPad app for Kraft, shown here.

What may further distinguish The Hyperfactory is the fact that it was recently acquired by publishing giant Meredith - pointing to potent synergies bridging content, database marketing and mobile.

The other day, I touched bases with another friend from Hyperfactory, North America SVP Jeff Arbour (a mobile marketing dynamo in his own right) to talk about these synergies - and how they might come into play in branded apps to come.

INTERVIEW: JEFF ARBOUR, SVP NORTH AMERICA, THE HYPERFACTORY (PT 1) IPAD APPS THAT ROCK

(Approx. 5:35)

 

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>>> IN STORES NOW - LEARN MORE (AND ORDER YOUR COPY) - HERE <<<

OD_cover

"... EXCELLENT ..."

Publisher's Weekly

 

"... A MUST-READ ..."

Russell Weiner, Chief Marketing Officer, Domino's Pizza, Inc.

 

"... WITTY, INSIGHTFUL, DYNAMIC AND HIGHLY INSPIRING ..."

Alison Moore, Vice President, Brand Strategy & Digital Platforms, HBO

 

"... TRULY A MUST-READ FOR MARKETERS WHO NEED TO CUT THROUGH THE CLUTTER ..."

Connor Brady, Chief Creative Officer, Organic, Inc.

 

"... REQUIRED READING FOR THE DIGITAL AGE ..."

Peter Cole, Technology Director, RGA

 

 >>> IN STORES NOW - LEARN MORE (AND ORDER YOUR COPY) - HERE <<<


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Esquire, Barnes & Noble Bring Cover Model To (Augmented) Reality

Ar_bandn Esquire cover model Brooklyn Decker is making appearances and posing for pictures at Barnes & Noble stores around the nation. Virtually, that is.

Esquire & B&N are running a promotion with GoldRun to enable shoppers to take mobile augmented reality photos of themselves posing with Decker as a way to promote B&N's newsstand.

Oh, and if you can track down augmented reality versions of the letters in the Esquire logo and you might just win an iPad.

If you can pull yourself away from Decker, that is.

For more on how major brands are putting mobile augmented reality to work, pick up a copy of my new book, THE ON-DEMAND BRAND (available everywhere books are sold).

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>>> IN STORES NOW - LEARN MORE (AND ORDER YOUR COPY) - HERE <<<

OD_cover

"... EXCELLENT ..."

Publisher's Weekly

 

"... A MUST-READ ..."

Russell Weiner, Chief Marketing Officer, Domino's Pizza, Inc.

 

"... WITTY, INSIGHTFUL, DYNAMIC AND HIGHLY INSPIRING ..."

Alison Moore, Vice President, Brand Strategy & Digital Platforms, HBO

 

"... TRULY A MUST-READ FOR MARKETERS WHO NEED TO CUT THROUGH THE CLUTTER ..."

Connor Brady, Chief Creative Officer, Organic, Inc.

 

"... REQUIRED READING FOR THE DIGITAL AGE ..."

Peter Cole, Technology Director, RGA

 

 >>> IN STORES NOW - LEARN MORE (AND ORDER YOUR COPY) - HERE <<<


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Interview: Matthew Rosenberg, Co-Founder of Fast Society

Matthew Press Shot Finally, a mobile app for your real social network.

There's an interesting article in this morning's New York Times that validates some of the prognostications I recently made to the AMA (and in my new book, THE ON-DEMAND BRAND, available everywhere books are sold) that the next year will see social media recalibrate to de-emphasize the quantity of "friends," "followers" and "likes" and emphasize the quality of real connections.

It got me thinking about a conversation I had the other day with Matthew Rosenberg, the co-founder of Fast Society, a hip new start-up that enables you to instantly connect with specific friends for nights out on the town, via group text messaging, calling and location.


So instead of texting or calling each member of the posse with details, locations and so forth, you use Fast Society to get everyone in one place at one time - and to share images and moments from the good times. None of which will live on to embarrass you on your Facebook page, which, let's face it, has pretty much morphed into a public, rather than intimately social, platform.

LogoAs for the opportunity for brands? Already MTV is using Fast Society to promote its new show "Skins." And as you're about to hear, that's just the tip of the iceberg.

INTERVIEW: MATTHEW ROSENBERG, CO-FOUNDER, FAST SOCIETY

(Approx. 11:58)

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>>> IN STORES NOW - LEARN MORE (AND ORDER YOUR COPY) - HERE <<<

OD_cover

"... EXCELLENT ..."

Publisher's Weekly

 

"... A MUST-READ ..."

Russell Weiner, Chief Marketing Officer, Domino's Pizza, Inc.

 

"... WITTY, INSIGHTFUL, DYNAMIC AND HIGHLY INSPIRING ..."

Alison Moore, Vice President, Brand Strategy & Digital Platforms, HBO

 

"... TRULY A MUST-READ FOR MARKETERS WHO NEED TO CUT THROUGH THE CLUTTER ..."

Connor Brady, Chief Creative Officer, Organic, Inc.

 

"... REQUIRED READING FOR THE DIGITAL AGE ..."

Peter Cole, Technology Director, RGA

 

 >>> IN STORES NOW - LEARN MORE (AND ORDER YOUR COPY) - HERE <<<


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Orabrush CMO Jeff Harmon (Concl) - How Brand Marketers Can Master YouTube

 Just got word this morning that Orabrush has just passed Sims and Apple to become the second most subscribed YouTube Channel. And today, Orabrush is launching an interactive video featuring Morgan the Dirty Tongue that enables users to make Morgan dance using the numerical keys on their keyboards. If you ask Salar Kamangar, co-head of YouTube, these are both just indicators of why Orabrush is the kind of brand custom built for YouTube success.

As he recently told Brand Channel, Orabrush is “the type of product you can’t sell with search, you can’t sell with display, but it’s uniquely able to sell because of the power of video’s medium. These are user-choice ads, things that people are choosing to click on.”

Jeff harmon In the conclusion of my recent interview with CMO Jeffrey Harmon - the man behind Orabrush's ridiculous (and by "ridiculous," I mean "massively successful") YouTube channel, he shares his perspective on Kamangar's contention.

And he shares how other marketers can start tapping into the power of YouTube videos, too.

TAPPING THE POWER OF YOUTUBE: THE JEFFREY HARMON INTERVIEW (CONCLUSION)

 (Approx. 2:47)

And don't miss:

1. SECRETS OF A SOCIAL MEDIA SENSATION: THE JEFF HARMON INTERVIEW (PT 1)

2. TALKING 'DIRTY': THE JEFF HARMON INTERVIEW (PT 2)

3. IPHONE APPS, FACEBOOK & THE POWER OF 'REVERSE BRANDING': THE JEFF HARMON INTERVIEW (PT 3)

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>>> IN STORES NOW - LEARN MORE (AND ORDER YOUR COPY) - HERE <<<

OD_cover

"... EXCELLENT ..."

Publisher's Weekly

 

"... A MUST-READ ..."

Russell Weiner, Chief Marketing Officer, Domino's Pizza, Inc.

 

"... WITTY, INSIGHTFUL, DYNAMIC AND HIGHLY INSPIRING ..."

Alison Moore, Vice President, Brand Strategy & Digital Platforms, HBO

 

"... TRULY A MUST-READ FOR MARKETERS WHO NEED TO CUT THROUGH THE CLUTTER ..."

Connor Brady, Chief Creative Officer, Organic, Inc.

 

"... REQUIRED READING FOR THE DIGITAL AGE ..."

Peter Cole, Technology Director, RGA

 

 >>> IN STORES NOW - LEARN MORE (AND ORDER YOUR COPY) - HERE <<<


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Orabrush CMO Jeff Harmon (Pt 3) - iPhone Apps, Facebook & The Power of 'Reverse Branding'

Orabrush_david_harmonWho says iFart was all bad?

In part three of my conversation with Orabrush CMO Jeff Harmon about the grassroots, social media efforts that Ad Age has placed among the top 10 of the last year, we learn that the popular iFart app inspired Orabrush's own iPhone app - The Bad Breath Detector. 

 

This last week, the brand even launched a paid version of the app, Bad Breath Detector Pro.

Here, we'll learn more about this app, the brand's Facebook integration, and most important of all, what Orabrush's 24-year-old CEO Jeff Davis - another Jeff - calls "Reverse Branding." 

IPHONES, FACEBOOK & REVERSE BRANDING: THE JEFFREY HARMON INTERVIEW (PT 3)

 (Approx. 5:49)

And don't miss:

SECRETS OF A SOCIAL MEDIA SENSATION: THE JEFF HARMON INTERVIEW (PT 1)

TALKING 'DIRTY': THE JEFFREY HARMON INTERVIEW (PT 2)

 

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>>> IN STORES NOW - LEARN MORE (AND ORDER YOUR COPY) - HERE <<<

OD_cover

"... EXCELLENT ..."

Publisher's Weekly

 

"... A MUST-READ ..."

Russell Weiner, Chief Marketing Officer, Domino's Pizza, Inc.

 

"... WITTY, INSIGHTFUL, DYNAMIC AND HIGHLY INSPIRING ..."

Alison Moore, Vice President, Brand Strategy & Digital Platforms, HBO

 

"... TRULY A MUST-READ FOR MARKETERS WHO NEED TO CUT THROUGH THE CLUTTER ..."

Connor Brady, Chief Creative Officer, Organic, Inc.

 

"... REQUIRED READING FOR THE DIGITAL AGE ..."

Peter Cole, Technology Director, RGA

 

 >>> IN STORES NOW - LEARN MORE (AND ORDER YOUR COPY) - HERE <<<


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