GEN WOW Pop Quiz: AI-Generated Halloween Costumes, Deep Fakes & The Impact of GDPR

It's time for everybody's favorite quiz on recent news from the intersection of marketing, media, tech and pop-culture. Good luck!

1. The New York Times recent reporting on The Spooky Side of Machine Learning, included a project in which artificial intelligence was trained to come up with Halloween costume ideas. Which of the following was not one of the costumes created by AI:

A. Zombie Schoolgirl

B. Toaster Boy

C. Ruth Bader Hat Guy

D. Frankenstein's Bunny

E. Vampire Baseball Clown

ANSWER: E      According to the Times, the neural network in the project produced different names at different stages or "epochs" of training that included Zombie Schoolgirl, Toaster Boy, Ruth Bader Hat Guy, Frankenstein's Bunny and Baseball Clown, to which we changed to Vampire Baseball Clown. One of our favorites was Donald McDonald, a cross between Ronald McDonald and the Donald. None of these, however, beat McGrimace dressed as Thanos at ComicCon.

 

2. Which of the following was not seen as a potential global development in next few years according to a new survey of C-level executives from AT Kearney:

A. Global 500 companies will be increasingly vulnerable to fake news campaigns

B. Corporate leaders will increasingly be expected to play roles in society beyond narrow corporate interests

C. Backlash against GDPR in the will inspire other countries to slow down efforts to expand privacy regulations

D. Extreme weather events will act as a drag on economic growth

Answer:  C     According to eMarketer reporting on a study titled "2018 Views from the C-Suite: An Annual Survey of Global Business Executives" from AT Kearney, each of these is something C-suite executives expect to see in the next few years - except for item C. Instead of a backlash against GDPR, the survey finds executives believe GDPR will inspire other countries to expand privacy regulations. Case in point: California's Consumer Privacy Act will have a dramatic impact on how tech companies, collect, store and use consumer data when it goes into effect in 2020.

 

3. Which of the following television shows had their premiere on October 25, 1971?

A. The Superfriends

B. Electric Company

C. Sigmund and the Sea Monsters

D. The Brady Kids Go to Rehab

Answer: B     The Electric Company debuted on October 25, 1971 and starred heavy hitters from stage, screen and improv—including established stars like Rita Moreno, as well as lesser known performers like a guy named Morgan Freeman who went on do a few things after leaving the show.

 

4. The Wall Street Journal recently reported on Deep Fakes, which are:

A. Fake news items created by the imaginary Deep State

B. Videos made with AI that make it possible to show anyone saying anything you want

C. Videos made with Ai that makes it possible to show anyone do anything you want

Answer: B     Deep fakes are videos that can be made to match people's facial expressions and voices to make it appear as if they are saying anything you want them to say (see the WSJ video above). In a society where reality is questioned, this technology may have enormous implications—further breaking people into tribes that only believe what they want.

 


Gen Wow Pop Quiz: White Castle WTF Edition

Gen Wow Loaded Questions: 1. White Castle's VP of Marketing recently admitted to which of the followingRiddle us this, and then riddle us some more:

1. White Castle VP of Marketing Kim Bartley recently admitted to which of the following:

A.  Preferring Big Macs to Sliders

B.  Spending a night binging on a Castle Pack of waffle sliders, fish nibblers and beer

 C. Spending a year as a vegetarian

D. Spending too much on a new Maserati

Answer: C

According to Ad Age, White Castle CMO Kim Bartley admitted to recently spending a year as a vegetarian after White Castle's failed attempt to add salads and so-so results for a veggie slider. But it helped pave the way, apparently, for the far more successful Impossible Slider, which is made of a meat-like substance that's meat-free.

 

2. Last seen during the Super Bowl, this CPG brand campaign has made a return visit to the NFL during Thursday night football:

A. Pringles Stackers "Wow"

B. Tide "It's a Tide Commercial"

C. Mr. Clean's "Clean AF"

D. Hefty's "Cray-Cray Party Moms Get Turnt"

Answer: B

Tide is bringing "It's a Tide Commercial" to football fans. Because you know football fans are deeply concerned about their laundry detergent .

 

3. This Halloween, US consumers are expected to:

A. Tune in for the 29th edition of the Simpson's "Halloween Treehouse of Horror"

B. Tune in for the 30th edition of the Simpson's "Halloween Treehouse of horror

C. Spend $3.2 billion on costumes led by 1. Princesses, 2 Superheroes, 3 Batman characters and 4 Star Wars characters

D. Spend nearly $2.6 billion on such delicacies as Snickers, Reese's, M&Ms and Coffee Makes Me Poop Gum

E. All the above, except for A

F. All the above, except for D

Answer: E

All of the above except for A. This is the 29th edition of the Simpson's "Halloween Treehouse of Horror," and according to the National Retail Federation, US consumers will spend $3.2 billion on Halloween costumes. Plus: they will spend $2.6 billion on candy—including Snickers, Reese's, M&M and such novelty candies as Coffee Makes Me Poop Gum, Bacon and Cheese Flavored Crickets, and National Embarrassmints. In all, US consumers will send $9 billion on Halloween crap this year.

 

4. According to a recent ADWEEK article entitled, "How Mr. Rogers Taught Me Everything I Need to Know about Marketing," which of the following is not one of those pearls of wisdom:

A. Be inclusive of ideas, differences of opinion and ways to get things done

B. Learn to apologize for hurt feelings, misunderstandings and problems requiring remediation

C. Learn to apologize for your stupid ideas

D. Learn to apologize for your stupid ideas, especially the one you had last week

E. Both C and D, but definitely not A and B

Answer: E

The article included such Mr. Rogers-inspired advice for marketers as, "Be inclusive if ideas, differences of opinion and ways to get things done;" "Learn to apologize for hurt feelings, misunderstandings and problems requiring remediation;"as well as "Don't ever be afraid to admit you don't know," "Be kind," and more.

 

5. A new consumer gadget called Portal is which of the following:

A. A new video chat device from Facebook

B. The second sign of the Apocalypse

C. A new video chat device from Facebook that uses AI to react to callers' movements by automatically panning in and zooming out and adjusting sound levels

D. A new chat device from Facebook that uses Amazon Alexa, thereby positioning the devices as competitors to Google Home and Apple's HomePod.

E. A, C and D

F. A, C, D and B depending on your point of view

Answer: E or F

Portal is a new video chat device from Facebook that could transform chat and even social media by bringing it into the living room. Or maybe it's this year's version of the Facebook Phone that took the nation by storm. It uses AI to react to callers' movements by automatically panning in and zooming out and adjusting sound levels. It also uses Amazon Alexa, thereby positioning the devices as a competitor to Google Home and Apple's HomePod. Given the fun we've all had with Cambridge Analytica and other incidents in recent times, it could very well be the second sign of the Apocalypse, depending on your point of view.

 


Things Our Grandkids Won't Believe We Said in 2018

Things kids won't believe we said in 2018

From an episode of Rick & Rick from earlier this year:  Rick Mathieson & Rick Wootten talk  about what data now shows IHOP'S "IHOB" stunt was a grand slam (sorry, Denny's). Plus: Things our grandkids will be amazed that people said in 2018.

Approx: 24 min

(This content for US audiences. Note that SoundCloud uses cookies for analytics per their privacy policy.) 

 


Burger King Brings AI-Fueled Hilarity to its TV Spots (Video)

Burger King's AI Written TV Commercials

Copywriters the world over can breathe a sigh of relief: AI won't be taking their jobs—at least not yet.

In a new campaign, Burger King demonstrates what happens when TV commercials are written by a machine learning algorithm with "advanced pattern recognition capabilities." Let's just say it's not what one might expect given all the hype around AI these days.

Then again, how else would you get lines like, "The chicken crossed the road to become a sandwich,"  "The Whopper lives in a bun mansion, just like you,"  and "Math is tasty ... eat the math. BK logo appears."

On top of its recent "Whopper Neutrality" and "Chick Tax" stunts, the King is on a role. It's secret? According to the brand, it's all about learning from hackers to establish what it calls "brand relevance."

Tasty, indeed.

Watch more of the commercials, here.

Learn more about Rick Mathieson and iMathieson:

Join our LinkedIn Group

Like us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter

Listen on iTunes

 


2030 Job Titles That Don't Yet Exist—and Lessons BK Learned from Hackers

Figure 2B-1 Alex Bogusky
In an episode from July, Rick Mathieson and Rick Wootten discuss the hot topics in the week that was in marketing, media and pop-culture, including:

• IHOB, Revisited (:30)

• Have the 'Star Wars' movies been sidelined? (1:53)

• Summer box office roundup (6:40)

• Marvel stars who weren't Marvel fans growing up (this is gonna hurt) (8:06)

• Blast from the past: An IBM portable computer spot from 1975 (this hurts, too) (9:40)

• New augmented reality business cards (12:52)

2030 job titles that don't exist—yet (14:20)

Lessons Burger King learned from hackers (18:00)

 

(For US audiences; Soundcloud uses cookies)


Rick & Rick: The One with 2018 Predictions in Marketing, Media & Tech (Podcast)

Rickandrick_logo2

 

 

 

It's our big predictions episode as Rick Mathieson and Rick Wootten reveal their top 5 predictions (some tongue-in-cheek) for marketing, media and technology in the year ahead.

What will 2018 have in store for AI, augmented reality, virtual reality, content marketing and more?

Listen now to find out:

Rick & Rick: Jan 2018 Predictions in Marketing, Media, Tech & More

(Approx 14 mins)

OR LISTEN ON iTUNES: Rick & Rick: The One with 2018 Predictions

(Approx 14 mins)

More on Rick & Rick:

Rick mathieson bxw

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rick Mathieson

 

Rick Wootten bxw

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

Rick Wootten

 

 

 

 


Top 10 Sci-Fi Movies of All Time—Pt 3: Red Pills & Mashed Potatoes (Podcast)

Sci_fi_podcast_top_10Keanu Reeves, Richard Dreyfuss, Spielberg and the Wachowskis. 

That's right: We're talking "The Matrix" and "Close Encounters of the Third Kind."

RICK & RICK RULE THE WORLD

>>CLICK TO LISTEN: TOP 10 SCI-FI MOVIES OF ALL TIME—PT 3: RED PILLS & MASHED POTATOES<<

(Approx. 4 mins, 35 sec) 

 

More on Rick & Rick:

Rick mathieson bxw

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rick Mathieson

Rick Wootten bxw

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rick Wootten


Is 'Amazon Go' the Future of Whole Foods? (Video)

Mobile_amazon_go_rick_mathieson_genwow_generationwow As goes Whole Foods, so goes the future of grocery stores?

A lot has been made of Amazon's recent announcement that it will acquire Whole Foods for a whopping $13.7 billion (insert your own "Whole Paycheck" joke here).

Many  have speculated the brand will continue to operate as it has, with enhanced pre-ordering and home delivery. But Amazon may have something far bigger in mind.

As Business Insider recently pointed out, Amazon released a video back in December on a concept it calls 'Amazon Go'.

Here, shoppers use an Amazon Go app to pre-order items in a virtual cart. When they get to the store, they simply walk in, scan the app at a turnstile, pick up the items they want, and walk out the door, without ever digging for cash, writing a check, swiping a card—or ever standing in line.

Using what Amazon calls "Just Walk Out" technology, Amazon Go leverages "deep learning algorithms, computer vision and sensor fusion" to keep track of what you pick up in-store. It'll even know if you put something back, or picked up additional items, and update your order. Everything's automatically charged to your account when you walk out the door.

It's a fascinating and compelling vision. It's also one shared by many others, of course.

It's been well over a decade since I started chatting with Seth Godin, Tom Nicholson and others about the concept—and how elements of it have already been applied for brands such as Prada and Tesco—as showcased in my books, The On-Demand Brand and Branding Unbound.

What I think is especially elegant about Amazon's concept is that it at least appears to remove the need for things like RFID tags to be applied at the item level, and for readers to be set up throughout the store—something that has so far proven costly and impractical. At least from this video, the technology appears to be completely invisible to the customer. The first Go location opened for Amazon employees in Seattle earlier this year.

It'll be a blast to see how the concept develops, and what role if any Whole Foods ultimately plays in its evolution.

However things play out there, it's hard to imagine some version of this concept is not just the future of Whole Foods or even just the grocery category.

It's the future of retailing itself.

Click to learn more about Amazon Go.

Learn more about iMathieson

Join our LINKEDIN GROUP

Like us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter

Listen in on iTunes