👁👄👁 How 'It Is What It Is' Took Silicon Valley by Storm, Dos Equis' Social Distancing Cooler

Dos Equis toasts its new six-foot-long social distancing cooler. The secrets of latent semantic indexing. The secret "Princess Pride" remake. And WTAF is "It Is What It Is"? The Ricks have answers—plus some Loaded Questions of their own. From July 5.

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IN THIS EPISODE

🇺🇸Fourth of July memories (at 1-min, 4-sec)

👸🏽Something to Quibi about: Celebrities stage their own "Prince Bride" fan film (at 2:32)

📱MIT Tech Review: What grown-ups don't get about teens, tech, and social media (at 4:19)

📺Mental Floss unearths cringeworthy commercials from the '80s and '90s (at 6:45)

😎Dos Equis has a new seis-foot ice cooler for a summer of social distancing (at 9:30)

🤖'b' role: The new sci-fi thriller starting an actual AI robot in the leading role (at 11:09)

🗂What you need to know about Latent Semantic Indexing (LSI) (at 12:36)

👁👄👁"It Is What It Is" wasn't what you thought it was (at 14:00)

Approximately 16-minutes, 13-seconds. For US audiences.
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🔆 Don't Go Dark—John Sculley's Advice to Marketers in Perilous Times

In this Rick and Quick episode, the Ricks talk about some new advice from John Sculley, the former CMO of Pepsi and Apple, on brand marketing in an unprecedented business environment. From June 30.

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IN THIS EPISODE

📣Rising to the Pepsi Challenge–and shining up a struggling Apple (at :20-seconds)

🌘Your brand: Shining Bright–or Getting Eclipsed? (at 1-minute, 11-seconds)

🥰Building Brand Loyalty (at 2:15)

👁Out of Sight, Out of Shopping Cart (at 2:53)

🏄🏻‍♂️Coasting on Famous Old Campaigns…(at 3:36)

😳…Or Getting Crushed by Them…(at 4:09)

📈…Or Getting Ahead of the Curve (at 5:33)

Approximately 6-minutes, 15-seconds. For US audiences.


🥽 How COVID-19 Will Shape the Future of Virtual Reality

"The Mandalorian" tries on some 501's. The Justice League stars in a gory new R-rated animated movie. ADWEEK asks: What brands would you want to shelter with most? Starbucks switches up its strategy for the time of COVID-19, and more. From June 26. 

IN THIS EPISODE

🚀 Disney+ hit "The Mandalorian" tries on some of their favorite 501's (at 1-min, 34-sec)

💥 The SuperFriends it ain't: The gory new, R-rated "Justice League" animated movie is pure <BLEEP> (at 3:38)

🕹 Virtually House Bound: The impact of COVID-19 on the future of virtual reality (at 5:07)

🏘 ADWEEK wants to know: With what "house" of brands would you want to shack up with most? (at 9:39)

🖖🏽 Turns out James T. Kirk may be into little green men, too (at 12:53)

🧗🏻‍North Face joins brands boycotting Facebook–will more join the party? (at 14:09)

☕️ Starbucks' plans for a post-"third place" world (at 14:45)

Approximately 17-minutes, 3-seconds. For US audiences.

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🎁Interview–GiftSuite CEO Sangita Verma: Gifting in the New Normal

HEADSHOT_Sangita Verma_GiftSuite_CEOIn a recent interview, GiftSuite CEO Sangita Verma shares how she's redefining the gift-giving experience in the time of COVID-19.

GiftSuite's unique brand of thoughtfully-curated, tech-forward curios includes a water bottle with a UV-C LED bottle cap that sanitizes your water and can do the same for your keyboard and mobile phone at the wave of your hand.

It's a timely and insightful conversation with a serial entrepreneur who has made a name for herself by spotting hidden opportunities and capitalizing on them. From June 16.

IN THIS EPISODE

🦠 Plan C: 3 top tips to marketers in a post-pandemic world (at 1 min, 45 sec)

⏱ Crisis marketing: Working at the speed of the news cycle  (at 4:43)

💡 The idea behind GiftSuite and  its Life 2020 collection (at 5:57)

💦     The germicidal bottle cap you didn't know you needed (at 8:04)

☮️     Finding the off-switch: The little device for calming your Vagus nerve (at 9:10)

🕴 You're never too young to launch a startup (at 10:36)

Approx. 11 minutes, 48 seconds. For US audiences. Review cookie and privacy policies for iTunes, Spotify, Soundcloud and all other streaming services.


✊🏻 McThankYou Meals, Nationwide's Voices & More

A look at HBO Max, because there just aren't enough subscription video streaming services out there. Plus: McDonald's gets McThankful, and Nationwide is hearing "Voices," as the Ricks are back with some all-new Loaded Questions. From May 18. 

IN THIS EPISODE

📺 Another week, another new subscription video streaming service (at :30 seconds)

🍔 McDonald's has a message for healthcare workers and first responders (at 1:52)

⏯ Nationwide Insurance lets you give some advice to your future self (at 2:54)

Approximately 5 minutes. For US audiences.

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🔑 3 Keys to Marketing in a Post-Pandemic World

The Ricks share some of insights on marketing's new normal. Non-essential worker Barbie makes the most of quarantine. Baby reveals come to Zoom. Plus, are virtual barbers head and shoulders above the real thing? From June 26. 

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IN THIS EPISODE

✂️ Weeks into lockdown, Rick W. is digging for his Flowbee (at 1-min, 11-second)

💇🏻‍♂️ Rick M. decides to cut his own hair—so what could go wrong? (at 1:50)

📈 Do out-of-work barbers have a future in consulting? (at: 3:00)

🏠 Sheltering-in-dreamhouse: Meet non-essential worker Barbie (at: 4:10)

🛍 Just how much has the coronavirus pandemic changed marketing? (at 5:38)

🌎 The digital world's population boom (at 6:50)

🍕 BOPIS with a side of pizza: Your business model, revisited (at 9:12)

💈 Will the new barbershop experience come with nitrous oxide? (at 11:00)

🎪 Can VR save trade shows? (at 11:34)

🤑 Is it time to cut your marketing budget? Or double down? (at 16:05)

🤝 Deal making in a post-handshake world (at 16:57)

👶🏻 Baby reveals, by way of Zoom (at 19:30)

Approximately 20 minutes, 40 seconds. For US audiences.

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❤️ 5 Brands Millennials Love Most

It's a quick round of Loaded Questions as we reveal the five most beloved brands to Millennials. From March 22.

IN THIS EPISODE

🥜 Enter: Gif Peanut Butter - but isn't it really a soft "G"? (at :25 seconds)

💘 Which 5 brands have Millennials needing a few minutes alone? (at 1:35)

💗 … And what about Generation Z? (at 3:05)

📖 Ebooks and white papers: Where do they best fit in the marketing funnel (at 3:3)

OR

Listen: ❤️ 5 Brands Millennials Love Most Gif Peanut Butter & EBooks' Spot in the Marketing Funnel

Approx. 5 minutes, 12 seconds. For US audiences. Review cookie and privacy policies for iTunes, Spotify, Soundcloud and all other streaming services.


🎁 Cybertruck Blows Up The Internet, The Lightsaber That ... Meows? And More

🎅🏼 Tesla's Cybertruck takes the Internets by storm, and not all goes well. The holiday yule log gets spit-roasted—ASMR style. Our Top 3 Tech Toys Gone Wrong. The 'Christmas Pizza' that's covered in turkey and gravy—and served in a singing box, plus a whole lot more. 

🚀 Rise of Skywalker: How will this chiasmus conclude the chiasmi? (at :42 seconds)
 
📺 What the hell is The Mandalorian? And why isn't that Boba Fett and Yoda? (at 2:28)
 
📐 Tesla Cybertruck: Big splash, or botched launch? (at 3:45)
 
🔫 Our Top 3 Tech Toys for Holiday 2019—including a Lightsaber that … meows? (at 6:30)
 
💣 Our Top 3 Tech Toys Gone Wrong—including one inspired by Tesla (at 8:30)
 
🍕 The Christmas Pizza comes lathered with turkey, gravy, and a psychotic theme song (9:54)
 
🥩 The Beef Drool Log comes with ASMR-like sound effects and … an AI-based personal assistant?  (at 11:15)
 
🎄 Cardi B or Anna Kendrick? Will the holiday TV spot imposter please stand up? (at 12:25)
 
🛍 From Santa's WTF workshop: animal dissection kits, fluffy pets with removable fur and other gifts for children (at 13:18)
 
☃️ Some holiday chestnuts about goosing the kids, making memories and more (at 14:00)
 
🥁 The Ricks reveal the title of their future Claymation holiday television special (at 14:58)
 
Approx. 15 min, 40 sec. For US audiences. Review cookie and privacy policies for iTunes, Spotify, Soundcloud and all other streaming services.

🦃 A Pringles Thanksgiving, Singles Day Stats, Twinkies Cereal, Why VR Stinks & More

Singles Day scores $1 billion in its first :60-seconds. "Arson Frog" and "Okay Boomer" have meme warfare raging among generations. Plus: Twinkies cereal ignites a social media storm, what fMRI tells us about holiday shopping behaviors, why the future of VR may stink, Loaded Questions, and more.  

IN THIS EPISODE

📺 'Prime' Evil: 'Man in the High Castle' Season 4 (at 1 minute, 43 sec)

🤯 Meme Warfare: 'Arson Frog' Catches Fire as 'Okay Boomer' Explodes (at 3:26)

💩 Smell-o-Vision: Why the Future of VR Might Stink (at 5:50)

💰 $1 Billion Sold in :60-Seconds: Our Singles Day Scorecard (at 7:16)

🤢  Turducken Pringles: Any way you stack 'em, someone's sure to cry fowl (at 8:53)

🥣 Twinkies for Breakfast: Social Media Cause Célèbre—or Cereal Offender?  (at 10:08)

👺 Why Deep Fakes Mean Real Trouble for Business in 2020 (at 11:44)

🛍 Google Data: Top 3 Best (and Worst) Holiday Purchase Influencers (at 13:06)

🧠 What fMRI Brain Scans Tell Us About True Shopping Influencers (at 13:50)

🎅🏼 Six Fewer Days for St. Nick: Online Retail's Race Against the 2019 Calendar (at 14:58)

Listen via streaming, or click here

Approx. 16 min, 5 sec. For US audiences. Review cookie and privacy policies for iTunes, Spotify, Soundcloud and all other streaming services.


Danger Ahead? The Rapidly Evolving World of Neuromarketing

Gw_fmri_neuromarketingjpgYou know the old joke: If Henry Ford had asked consumers whether they’d be interested in an automobile, they’d have told him no—they really just wanted a faster horse.

For all the targeting capabilities martech is bringing to bear these days, it may offer less than we realize in understanding, much less predicting, what products we are most likely to buy, or what we really want from a brand.

The fact is, people may not (in fact, usually don’t) really know what they prefer, or they may edit their real preferences when asked about them—revealing what they think they think, or what they'd like to think they think. Social desirability (the urge to seek approval) may shade their responses. Or they may just want to pick “the right answer” in surveys and focus groups.

Which brings in the whole field of neuromarketing and the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), or “brain scans,” to quite quickly and accurately assess the neurological impact of advertising across the parts of the brain associated with "value," "emotion," and "motivation," according to Insead Knowledge.

Ferreting Out Focus Group Fallacies

As I discussed in my book The On-Demand Brand, scientists at Baylor University, for instance, have used fMRI to determine true preference for Coke or Pepsi, and scientists at UCLA can tell whether you’re really a Republican or a Democrat. Meanwhile, Mars long ago discovered that fMRI had the most predictive of in-market ad effectiveness. Survey results didn't even come close. Put another way, fMRI "shows that when evaluating brands, consumers primarily use emotions (personal feelings and experiences), rather than information (brand attributes, features, and facts)."

As Insead puts it, advances in Electroencephalography (EEG) also show promise in assessing memory processing, attention, and emotional engagement. According to Martech Advisor, for instance, Cheetos once discovered that while focus group participants said they didn't like an edgy prankvertising-style commercial, brain scans showed they actually loved the spot. Participants said they didn't want to admit liking it for fear of being judged. The prank campaign was a huge success and helped Cheetos position itself around mischievousness and thrill-seeking.

Perhaps more importantly, these technologies are helping marketers understand how to manipulate consumer emotional response as well. Harvard Business Review once famously pointed out that fMRI showed that showing a higher price tag while people were tasting identical wines made the wine taste better—by "changing the actual neural signature of the taste."

From Brand Promotion to Breaking-and-Entering?

Still, the whole notion of neuromarketing raises serious questions. What happens when guesswork is taken out of advertising?

As Campaign recently pointed out, technological advances are such that we're not far from a day when your brain's activity signals will be made available to a degree in which "brands will be able to literally read the market's mind, in real time." One can just imagine what brands—or platforms such as say, Facebook—might do with that kind of intelligence.

What happens when the same technologies that track our behavior can also scan our brains as we drive past billboards or walk into stores, to send us just the right pitch—nearly guaranteed to work—right at the most opportune moment?

What responsibility do marketers bear in protecting consumer privacy and, for lack of a better term, mental sovereignty? What do we, as a society, need to do to make sure that happens?